Go Bananas For Bananas

Bananas
Bananas

Bananas are one of the most widely consumed fruits in the world for good reason.  They are extremely healthy and delicious.  There are several varieties, which vary in color, size and shape.  The most common type is the yellow banana which is green when unripe.

You may already know that bananas are a great source of potassium.  A medium-sized banana has 422 mg of the mineral, which is about 12% of the recommended daily value according to the USDA.  Bananas are also a good source of vitamins C and B6.  A medium-sized banana has 15% and 30% of the recommended daily value of these two vitamins respectively.

Reasons To Eat Bananas

1. Bananas help keep blood pressure in check

Bananas are rich in potassium, and a potassium-rich diet helps lower blood pressure.  According to the American Heart Association, the more potassium you consume, the more sodium that can exit your body.  That is because potassium acts like a natural diuretic.  It triggers the kidneys to release excess sodium and fluids the body is holding on to, lowering blood pressure in the process.  Bananas are also a good source of magnesium which also helps lower blood pressure.  Lower blood pressure is great for your heart, because the muscle won’t have to work as hard to pump blood throughout your body.

2. Bananas are good for your gut bacteria

You’ve probably heard of probiotics, the “good” bacteria that aid digestion and are found in certain foods like yogurt.  Well there’s also such a thing as prebiotics, and bananas happen to be a great source of them.  Prebiotics are actually carbohydrates that can’t be digested by the human body, however they play a vital role in maintaining a healthy gut.  Prebiotics supply food for the probiotics, so they help the “good” probiotic bacteria grow.  You’ll also find prebiotics in raisins, asparagus, onions, and garlic.

3. Bananas can ease stomach troubles

Bananas can help with several tummy issues.  The 3.1 grams of fiber you’ll find in a medium banana is split into two different types: soluble and insoluble fiber.  Soluble fiber helps ease digestion, while insoluble fiber helps relieve constipation.  Bananas also neutralize the acidity in the stomach and coat the lining to reduce irritation, so they can help fight heartburn and stomach ulcers too.

4. Bananas help protect the cardiovascular system

Bananas represent an important part of overall heart health for a variety of reasons.  The potassium in bananas helps reduce blood pressure.  In addition to being a diuretic, bananas are vasodilators.  This means they relax the tension of the blood vessels helping the blood flow more smoothly through the body and oxygenate the various organs of the body to increase their function.  This can help reduce atherosclerosis and reduce cardiovascular disease risk.  The fiber in bananas also helps scrape excess cholesterol from the blood vessels which also reduces cardiovascular disease risk.

Ways to Enjoy Bananas

  • Just peel and eat: Take a banana with you to work or school for a healthy, portable snack.
  • On cereals: Add a sliced banana to your morning cereal or oatmeal for a more nutritious breakfast.
  • In smoothies: Peel and freeze bananas (or use fresh) for a great addition to any smoothie.
  • In baked goods: Ripe, mashed bananas can be used in baked goods to replace oil or butter.  Mashed bananas lend a moist, natural, sweet flavor to cakes, muffins, breads, and cookies.
  • With peanut butter:  A peanut butter and banana sandwich is an all-time favorite comfort food for children and adults alike.
  • Healthy fruit salad: Include banana slices along with orange slices, strawberries, and mango chunks in your next fruit salad.
  • Yogurt topping: Sweeten plain yogurt with slices of banana for a delicious dessert or snack.

Health Benefits of Oranges

Oranges
Oranges

Long recognized as a potent source of vitamin C, oranges are considered by most to be tasty, juicy, and all too familiar.  The discoveries being made about the power of oranges to support heart health and prevent cancer, stroke, diabetes and other chronic ailments are bringing them and other citrus fruits into the limelight as crucial components of a healthy diet.

Oranges originated in Asia thousands of years ago and have become one of the most popular fruits the world over.  Christopher Columbus brought orange seeds to the Caribbean Islands in the 15th century, and Spanish explorers then brought oranges to Florida in the next century.  About 200 years later, Spanish missionaries brought oranges to California.  Florida and California remain the primary producers of oranges in the United States.

Portable fruits, they are easy to eat and crucial to good health.  They are easy to put in children’s lunch boxes and bags, and they are the perfect mid-day snack when you are craving something sweet.  Oranges are also great flavor boosters when cooked with chicken or lean turkey breast.

Oranges are classified into two general categories: sweet and bitter.  The sweet varieties are the most commonly consumed and popular varieties include valencia, jaffa, navel, and blood oranges.  The blood orange is a hybrid species that is smaller in size and marked by red hues running throughout its flesh.

Bitter oranges are often used to make jam or marmalade, and their zest is used as the flavoring for liqueurs such as Grand Marnier and Cointreau.

Reasons To Eat Oranges

1. Oranges protect against cancer

Oranges contain a phytonutrient called limonene.  Limonene stimulates our antioxidant detoxification enzyme system, helping to stop cancer before it begins.  Oranges contain significant amounts of limonene in the peel and smaller quantities in the pulp.  Limonene has been proven to help fight a number of varieties of cancer including that of the lung, skin, breast, stomach, and colon.

Vitamin C, abundantly available in oranges, also plays a role in fighting cancer.  One study of Swiss men found that those who died of any type of cancer had vitamin C concentrations about 10 percent lower than those who died from other causes.

2. Oranges lower cholesterol

One cup of orange segments contain four grams of fiber, most of which is soluble fiber.  Since they are full of soluble fiber, oranges help lower cholesterol by binding with cholesterol in your gut and preventing it from being absorbed into your bloodstream.  This reduces risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease.

3. Oranges strengthen immunity

Scientific studies show the abundance of polyphenols in oranges protects against viral infections.  The vitamin C in oranges also protects cells in your body by neutralizing free radicals.  Free radicals cause chronic diseases, like cancer and heart disease.

4. Oranges lower stroke risk

Oranges are rich in vitamin C, and several scientific studies found a high blood concentration of vitamin C is associated with a lower stroke risk.  In one large study published in 2008, University of Cambridge researchers measured vitamin C levels in roughly 20,000 people and followed them for over a decade.  The participants were divided into four groups based on vitamin C levels.  The researchers found that those with the highest concentrations of the vitamin in their blood had a 42 percent lower stroke risk than those with the lowest concentrations.

5. Oranges regulate blood sugar levels

The orange has a glycemic index of 40.  Anything under 55 is considered low.  Therefore oranges will not spike your blood sugar and cause problems with insulin and weight gain as long as you do not eat too many at one time.

6. Oranges support heart health

Oranges are full of potassium, an electrolyte mineral responsible for helping the heart function well.  When potassium levels get too low, you may develop an abnormal heart rhythm known as an arrhythmia.

7. Oranges regulate high blood pressure

The flavonoid hesperidin found in oranges helps regulate high blood pressure.  Oranges also contain potassium and magnesium which help maintain blood pressure.

8. Oranges protect your vision

Oranges are rich in carotenoid compounds which are converted to vitamin A and help prevent macular degeneration as we age.

Putting It Into Practice

  • Warm your day: Oranges added to oatmeal is a great way to start your day.
  • Spice up your fruit salad: Be sure to include oranges in your next fruit salad.  Mix orange slices, mango chunks, and strawberries to your fruits salad with a sprinkle of chili powder.
  • Vibrant salad:  Add orange slices, strawberries, and walnuts onto a bed of your favorite field greens for a salad that is sure to please.
  • 100 percent juice: Just squeeze fresh oranges and enjoy.  Keep in mind that the whole fruit is more nutritious than the juice, because it contains more fiber.
  • Slice it or just peel and eat: Whatever your favorite way to eat an orange is, just take a bite into this delicious citrus fruit.
  • Use the peel: Orange peel is both flavorful and healthy.  If your recipe calls for orange zest, be sure to use organically grown oranges since conventionally grown fruits have pesticide residue on their skin and may also be artificially colored.

The Several Benefits of Avocados

An avocado
An Avocado

Avocado – that buttery green fruit that you can spread on a sandwich, dice into a salad, and mash into guacamole (America’s favorite dip).  Research has demonstrated that avocados offer some surprising and powerful health benefits.

One of the most nutrient-dense foods, avocados are high in fiber, folate, potassium, vitamin E, and magnesium.  No doubt, avocado nutrition makes it a powerful superfood.

Avocados have been cultivated for thousands of years.  A favorite of the Aztecs, they were originally native to Central America.  There are generally two types available in the USA today – the Hass avocado from California and the West Indian avocado from Florida.

Hass avocados are nutty, buttery and rich in monounsaturated oil (18 to 30 percent oil in each avocado).  The light green Florida avocado is larger and juicier than the Hass variety, but it is less buttery, considerably lower in oil (3 to 5 percent oil) and has roughly 25 to 50 percent less fat than the Hass variety.

The avocado’s monounsaturated fat content is its biggest health claim.  The only other fruit with a comparable amount of monounsaturated fat is the olive.  The monounsaturated fat in avocados is oleic acid, which helps lower cholesterol.  One study found that after seven days on a diet that included avocados, there were significant decreases in both total cholesterol and LDL (bad) cholesterol, as well as an 11 percent increase in HDL (good) cholesterol.

Reasons To Eat Avocados

1. Avocados are packed with carotenoids

Avocados are a great source of lutein, a carotenoid that works as an antioxidant and helps protect against eye disease.  They also contain related carotenoids zeaxanthin, alpha-carotene and beta-carotene, as well as vitamin E.

2. Avocados are rich in healthy fats

Since carotenoids are fat-soluble, they need to be eaten with fats at the same meal to be absorbed into the blood stream.  Avocados are rich in monounsaturated fats that help the body absorb these carotenoids from the avocado and also from other foods.  An easy way to do this is to add sliced avocado to a mixed salad.

3. Avocados make you feel full

Half an avocado contains 3.4 grams of fiber, including soluble and insoluble, both of which your body needs to keep the digestive system running smoothly.  The soluble fiber also slows the breakdown of carbohydrates in your body, helping you feel full longer.

Avocados also contain oleic acid, a monounsaturated fat that activates the part of your brain that makes you feel full.  Healthier unsaturated fats containing oleic acid have been shown to produce a greater feeling of satiety than less healthy saturated fats and trans fats found in processed foods.

4. Avocados are rich in folate

One cup of avocado contains almost a quarter of the recommended daily intake of folate, a vitamin which cuts the risk of birth defects.  So if you are pregnant, or planning to be, avocados will help protect your unborn baby.

A high folate intake is also associated with a lower risk of heart attacks and heart disease.  So avocados could help keep your heart healthy.

5. Avocados can help lower your cholesterol

In addition to making you feel full, the oleic acid in avocados can help lower cholesterol levels. In one study, an avocado-rich diet resulted in a significant reduction in total cholesterol levels and an 11 percent increase in HDL (good) cholesterol.

6. Avocados can regulate your blood pressure

Avocados are full of potassium and magnesium, two nutrients known to lower blood pressure.  A one-cup serving of avocado contains 15% of the RDI of potassium compare to 11% in bananas, which are a typical high-potassium food.  The avocado also contains 14% of the RDI of magnesium, more than several fruits including the banana, strawberry, and kiwi.

7. Avocados taste great

Avocados are a healthy way to boost the flavor and texture of your meals.  Toss chopped avocados on a salad or bowl of soup.  Serve guacamole as an appetizer or condiment.

Putting It Into Practice

  • Salads: Garnish vegetable, fruit, and whole grain salads with diced avocados, and then toss gently to mix.
  • Pasta salads: Add diced avocado, diced bell pepper, and sliced scallions to cooked pasta, and dress with a mixture of extra-virgin olive oil, vinegar, and mustard for a tasty pasta salad.
  • Guacamole:  Mashed avocados are the main ingredient in this tasty dip.
  • Spreads: Mash half an avocado and spread it on whole grain bread or toast for a nourishing breakfast or snack.
  • Wraps: Put sliced avocado in wraps and sandwiches.
  • Omelets: Add diced avocado to eggs or omelets before cooking.
  • Crackers: Top whole grain crackers with thin slices of avocado and smoked salmon for a tasty appetizer or snack.
  • Butter: Top baked potatoes with avocado butter, made by mashing a ripe avocado with a tablespoon of lemon or lime juice, salt and pepper.

Kiwi Fruit: The Chinese Gooseberry

Kiwi Fruit
Kiwi Fruit

The kiwi or kiwifruit is one of nature’s perfect foods: low in calories and an excellent source of antioxidants, and people are attracted to it because of its brilliant green color and exotic taste.  While many fruits offer one or two nutrients in their profile, kiwi offers an unusual array of health-promoting substances.

Kiwi is native to China.  Cultivation spread from China in the early 20th century to New Zealand, where the first commercial plantings occurred.  It is now a commercial crop in several countries, such as Italy, New Zealand, France, Greece, and Chile.

Kiwi Fast Facts

  • Extremely rich in vitamin C.
  • Contains folate, potassium, fiber, and various antioxidants like carotenoids and polyphenols.
  • Is an unusual source of vitamin E because most sources of this important vitamin, like nuts and oils, are high in both fat and calories.  However kiwi offers its rich nutritional bounty for only about 93 calories per two kiwis.

Reasons to Eat Kiwis

1. Vitamin C

A kiwi contains a rich bounty of vitamin C (70 mg for one kiwi).  That is more than an equivalent amount of orange.  Vitamin C is proven to boost the immune system and fight the effects of stress and aging.  It is no wonder that a high consumption of foods containing this vitamin is associated with reduced risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease.

2. Fiber

Two kiwis contain 5 g of fiber, which helps maintain heart health, regular digestion, and lower cholesterol.

3. Potassium

A kiwi contains 237 mg of potassium.  Potassium helps lower blood pressure, maintain fluid and electrolyte balance, and  release energy during exercise.  The potassium in kiwifruit also counteracts the effects of sodium and is a vasodilator, relaxing the blood vessels throughout the body.

4. Antioxidants

Kiwis are an excellent source of antioxidants like carotenoids and polyphenols which are important in reducing your risk of cancer, heart disease, and stroke.

5. Low Glycemic Index

Kiwis have a glycemic index of 52, which is relatively low.  This means that kiwis should not cause major blood sugar spikes.

6. Magnesium

A kiwi  contains 13 mg of magnesium, which improves nerve and muscle function while boosting your energy level.  Magnesium is also important in lowering blood pressure.

7. Lutein

Kiwis contain the phytochemical lutein, which works to prevent age-related blindness and protects the eyes from various kinds of damage.

8. Folate

A kiwi has 20 micrograms of folate.  That is nearly 10% of the recommended daily allowance.  Therefore kiwis are a good way to protect the health of mother and baby during pregnancy.

9. Vitamin K

Kiwi’s substantial supply of vitamin K (31 micrograms in one kiwi) is needed in your body for healthy arteries.  Vitamin K is also needed to use calcium to make bones.  Studies suggest that diets high in Vitamin K can improve bone health and reduce risk of bone-related injuries and diseases like osteoporosis.

10. Vitamin E

Kiwis are one of just a handful of fat-free foods that contain vitamin E, which boost immunity, lower cholesterol, and fight free radicals.

Putting It Into Practice

  • Conventionally grown kiwis are low in pesticides: Kiwis are one of the fruits with low pesticide residue.  They are included in the list of commonly eaten fruits and vegetables known as the “clean 15.”  Therefore it is not necessary to buy organically grown varieties.  Also, always wash fruit before eating.
  • Eat fresh and in salads: Kiwis are great eaten fresh or tossed into green salads.
  • Use as a topping: Kiwis can be added to oatmeal, cereal and yogurt.
  • Cook them: Kiwis can be used in baked foods like cobblers and fruit tarts.
  • Chutney: Mix sliced kiwis and other fruits (like orange and pineapple) to make chutney, which can be served as an accompaniment to fish or chicken.
  • A balanced diet is best: While kiwis are healthy, it is best to include other fruits to meet your daily fruit quota.  So in addition to kiwis, also eat the colors of the rainbow (blue, purple, red, yellow, green, orange) for better total health.

Why Blueberries Are So Amazing

Blueberries
Blueberries

Blueberries are a very popular and tasty fruit.  Although blueberries are native to North America, they are grown commercially in the Americas and Europe.  They are low in calories and incredibly healthy.  Often referred to as a superfood, blueberries are an excellent source of several vitamins, minerals, beneficial plant compounds, and antioxidants.

Blueberries have a pleasant, sweet taste and are available fresh, frozen, juiced, and dried.  They can be used in a variety of baked goods, jams, jellies, and for flavorings.

The two most common varieties of blueberries are highbush and lowbush blueberries.  Highbush blueberries are also called cultivated blueberries and are the most commonly grown species in the US.  They are cultivated on farms where they grow on bushes that usually peak around 6 feet high.  The blueberries are harvested by hand and also by machine.

Lowbush blueberries are also called wild blueberries.  They are not cultivated, but grow in the harsh northern climate of Maine and Canada.  The harsh climate, and what it takes to survive in it, gives wild blueberries a higher level of antioxidants than cultivated blueberries.

Blueberries range in color from blue to purple.

Reasons to Eat Blueberries

1. Blueberries are nutritious

A half-cup serving of blueberries contains 2 grams of dietary fiber and 25 percent of the recommended daily value of vitamin C, and only 40 calories.  Much of the power of blueberries lies in their colors.  The deep blue hue comes from anthocyanins, antioxidants that could help protect the body from cardiovascular disease and cancer, as well as increase immune function.

2. Blueberries keep your brain sharp

A 2012 study by Harvard researchers found that a high intake of blueberries and strawberries, over time, could delay memory decline in older women by two and a half years.  The researchers observed a modest reduction in memory decline among women who consumed two half-cup servings or more of blueberries and strawberries a week.

3. Blueberries fight cancer

Research done by Rutgers University show that Pterostilbene, a major component of blueberries, protects against colon cancer.  Blueberry extract has also been found to inhibit the growth of breast cancer cells and decrease enzymes associated with cancer spreading.

4. Blueberries lower blood pressure

Blueberries are an excellent source of anthocyanins which seem to lower blood pressure and make blood vessels dilate.  A 2011 study showed that eating just one cup of blueberries or strawberries a week can lower your risk of developing high blood pressure.  Over 100,00 men and women participated in the 14-year study.  The researchers found that those who consumed the most anthocyanins from blueberries and strawberries  had an 8% reduction in their risk of developing high blood pressure.  They concluded that the anthocyanins lower blood pressure by dilating the blood vessels.

5. Blueberries protect the heart

A study published in 2013 by Harvard School of Public Health showed that women who consumed three servings a week of blueberries or strawberries were 34% less likely to suffer a heart attack than women who ate the least of these fruits.  Although the 18-year study focused on young and middle-age women, the findings likely apply to everyone, including men.

6. Blueberries aid weight loss

Blueberries are a juicy fruit, which means they contain mostly water.  Juicy fruits are great for weight loss or weight maintenance, because they fill you up quickly with their high water content and minimal calories.

7. Blueberries improve blood sugar

Blueberries have a glycemic index of 53, which is relatively low.  This means that blueberries should not cause major blood sugar spikes.

8. Blueberries protect against Parkinson’s Disease

A 2011 study by the Harvard School of Public Health concluded that men and women who regularly eat berries may reduce their risk of developing Parkinson’s disease.  The researchers believe that the high flavonoid content in berries help ward off the disease.  Study participants who consumed the most flavonoids were 40% less likely to develop Parkinson’s.

Putting It Into Practice

  • Buy organic when possible: Because blueberries are vulnerable to worms and other insects, the conventionally grown varieties are heavily sprayed with pesticides.  Therefore it is best to buy organically grown varieties.  Also, always wash fruit before eating.
  • Eat fresh and in salads: Blueberries are great eaten fresh or tossed into green salads.
  • Use as a topping: Blueberries can be added to oatmeal, cereal and yogurt.  To prolong the shelf life, it is best to keep them refrigerated.
  • Cook them: Blueberries can be baked for added sweetness and nutrition.  They can also be made into jam and jelly.
  • Freeze them: You can buy frozen blueberries, or you can freeze fresh ones yourself.  During the summer months when blueberries are plentiful, you can buy them in large quantities on sale and freeze them.  Just wash and dry the berries, lay them on a pan and freeze until they are solid.  Package the frozen berries in freezer-safe storage bags, so they are ready for the winter months.
  • Try other berries: If you don’t like blueberries or can’t find them, other berries like strawberries, raspberries, and blackberries are a tasty alternative.
  • A balanced diet is best: While blueberries are healthy, it is best to include other fruits to meet your daily fruit quota.  So in addition to blueberries and other berries, also eat the colors of the rainbow (blue, purple, red, yellow, green, orange) for better total health.

Spotlight on Apples

Apples
Apples

An apple a day is perhaps one of the most delicious prescriptions ever made.  An apple contains a dose of pectin, the soluble fiber that thickens jellies and helps lower artery-damaging LDL (bad) cholesterol.  Apples also contain a mix of antioxidants.  Flavonoids, such as quercetin, prevent LDL cholesterol from being oxidized to a more dangerous form.

Apples have skin that’s loaded with nutrients.  For instance, the peel has six times the antioxidant power of the flesh.  Also, about two-thirds of an apple’s fiber is found in the peel.  Apples come in naturally gorgeous shades of green, golden yellow, red-orange and deep crimson

Some Key Scientific Studies

Some important scientific studies that reveal apples’ benefits are:

U.S. Study (2011): Florida State University researchers evaluated the long-term cardio-protective effects of daily consumption of apple in postmenopausal women.  They randomly assigned 160 women ages 45-65 to one of two dietary intervention groups: One ate dried apples (75 g/day for 1 year), and the other ate dried prunes everyday for a year.  Blood samples were taken at 3, 6, and 12 months.  Within 6 months, the apple-eating women experienced a 23% reduction in LDL (bad) cholesterol.  Another advantage is that the extra 240 calories a day did not lead to weight gain in the women.  In fact the women lost on, average, 3.3. lbs.

Dutch Study (2011): Researchers studied the diets of over 20,000 adults, with an average age of 41.  At the start of the study, all participants were free of cardiovascular disease.  Researchers examined the links between fruits and vegetable color group consumption and 10-year stroke incidence.  Fruits and vegetables were classified into four groups: Green (dark leafy vegetables, cabbages), Orange/Yellow (mostly citrus fruits), Red/Purple (mostly red vegetables), and White (mostly apples and pears).  During the 10-year study, 233 strokes were documented, and only white fruits and vegetables were linked to lower incidence of stroke.  In fact the risk of stroke incidence was 52 percent lower for people with a high intake of white fruits and vegetables compared to those with low intake.

Reasons to Eat Apples

  1. Apples are nutritious.  Apples contain vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.  One medium apple contains about 72 calories and has about 3 g of soluble fiber in the form of pectin.  An apple counts as one cup of fruit towards your daily fruit quota (around 2 cups on a 2,000-calorie diet).
  2. Apples can help prevent high blood pressure.  Apples contain potassium which helps our arteries dilate, lowering blood pressure.  Also quercetin, an antioxidant in apples, works with the cells in the inner lining (endothelium) of our arteries to make them dilate which lowers blood pressure.
  3. Apples lower cholesterol.  Apples contain pectin (about 3 g per medium apple), a soluble fiber, that binds with cholesterol in our gut and prevents it from being absorbed into our bloodstream.  This reduces risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease.
  4. Apples protect against colon cancer.  According to research from Germany, the fiber in apples ferments in the colon and produces chemicals that fight the formation of cancer cells.
  5. Apples provide bone protection.  Researchers believe that a flavonoid called phloridzin, found only in apples, may protect post-menopausal women from osteoporosis and also increase bone density.  Apple also contain boron which strengthens bones.
  6. Apples may help stave off Alzheimer’s disease.  Apples contain quercetin, a powerful antioxidant that protects brain cells from degeneration in rats and may do the same in humans.
  7. Apples may lower cardiovascular disease risk.  Apples help prevent the oxidation of cholesterol in our arteries thus reducing atherosclerosis.  This reduction in hardening of the arteries lowers our risk of cardiovascular disease.
  8. Apples decrease diabetes risk.  From a 2012 study, apples, as well as pears and blueberries, were linked to a lower risk of type II diabetes.  Researchers attribute the benefit to a class of antioxidants, anthocyanins, that give fruits and vegetables their purple, blue and red colors.
  9. Apples help in weight loss.  Flavonoid-rich fruits like apples have been linked by Harvard scientists to lower weight gain over many years.  The class of flavonoids called anthocyanins have been linked to the most weight control.

Putting It Into Practice

  • Buy organic when possible: Because apples are vulnerable to worms and other insects, the conventionally grown varieties are heavily sprayed with pesticides.  Therefore it is best to buy organically grown varieties.  Also, always wash fruit before eating.
  • Eat the peel: Apples are bursting with vitamins, minerals, fiber, and antioxidants.  It turns out that most of these nutrients are in the peel.
  • Eat fresh and in salads: Apples are great eaten fresh or cut up into slices and tossed with field greens, toasted pecans and a light vinaigrette in a delicious salad.  Also try apple slices on your favorite sandwich.
  • Cook them: Apples can be cooked in a myriad of ways – baked into pies, crisps, and tarts; added to poultry stuffing; and made into jelly, apple butter, and sauce.
  • Try pears: If you don’t like apples or can’t find them, pears are a tasty alternative.
  • A balanced diet is best: While apples are healthy, it is best to include other fruits to meet your daily fruit quota.  So in addition to apples, also eat the colors of the rainbow (blue, purple, red, yellow, green, orange) for better total health.

Hang Out In The Garden Of Eatin’

Healthy Berries
Healthy Berries at the Market

Fruits and vegetables are an important part of a healthy diet.  They contain an array of vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients.  They are also low in calories and high in fiber.  A diet rich in fruits and vegetables can

  • decrease the chances of having a heart attack or stroke;
  • lower blood pressure;
  • help you avoid constipation and diverticulitis;
  • guard against two common aging-related eye disease: cataract, the clouding of the eye’s lens, and macular degeneration, the major cause of vision loss afflicting people over sixty-five;
  • delay or prevent memory loss and a decline in thinking skills;
  • help you feel full with fewer calories and so control your weight and waistline; and
  • add variety to your diet and enliven your palate.

Family Nutrition

Fruits and vegetables can be classified by “family.”  These plant families you usually find at the market include the following:

  • The crucifer family: Includes broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, collard greens, kale, mustard greens, radishes, turnips, and watercress.  They contain chemicals that may protect against some cancers.
  • The melon/squash family: Includes cucumbers, zucchini, pumpkin, acorn and butternut squashes, cantaloupes, and honeydew melons.
  • The legume family: Includes alfalfa sprouts, beans, peas, and soybeans.  They contain substances that may protect against heart disease and cancer.
  • The lily family: Includes asparagus, chives, garlic, leeks, onions, and shallots.  They contain sulfur-containing compounds that may fight cancer.
  • The citrus family: Includes grapefruits, lemons, limes, oranges, and tangerines.  Citrus fruits are high in vitamin C.
  • The solanum family: Includes eggplant, peppers, potatoes, and tomatoes.  Tomatoes contain the powerful antioxidant lycopene, which may protect against prostate and other cancers.
  • The umbel family: Includes carrots, celery, parsley, and parsnips.  Carrots are an excellent source of beta-carotene, which the body uses to make vitamin A.  Beta-carotene and other related compounds called carotenoids help prevent cancers, heart disease, and memory loss.

No single fruit or vegetable contains all the substances you need, therefore it is a good idea to get a few servings a week from each of these major groups.  It’s also a good idea to eat for color variety to ensure you get a variety of beneficial phytonutrients.  Include the bold colors of ripe red tomatoes, crisp orange carrots, creamy yellow squash, emerald-green spinach, juicy blueberries, indigo plums, violet eggplants, and all shades in between.  You should also eat at least five servings of fruits and vegetables a day.

Putting It Into Practice

  • Aim high.  Use 5 servings a day as a minimum goal and aim for more.  A serving of fruits and vegetables is 1/2 cup except raw leafy greens, which is 1 cup.
  • Eat for variety and for color.  On most days try to eat from the following fruit and vegetable groups: dark green leafy vegetables, yellow or orange fruits and vegetables, red fruits and vegetables, legumes, and citrus fruits.
  • Cook your tomatoes.  Try tomatoes, processed tomatoes, or tomato products cooked in oil on most days.   Tomatoes are rich in lycopene, a powerful, fat-soluble antioxidant that has been linked to lower rates of a variety of cancers.  Because lycopene is tightly bound within cell walls, your body has a hard time extracting it from raw tomatoes.  Cooking breaks down the cell walls, and the oil dissolves lycopene so that it can enter the bloodstream.
  • Fresh is better.  Eat several servings of fresh, uncooked fruits and vegetables each week because cooking destroys some important phytonutrients (like vitamin C and folic acid).  Frozen fruits and vegetables are nearly as good as fresh ones and may be better than “fresh” fruits and vegetables that have been stored for weeks under conditions that prevent ripening.  Canned fruits and vegetables are also fine, though many come loaded with salt and added sugar.

 

Fruits and Vegetables: Get Five or More Servings Daily

Local market
Local Produce Market

Fruits and vegetables are important in the Mediterranean diet as they provide vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients (plant-based nutrients).  Fruits and vegetables are also low in calories and rich in dietary fiber.  Include a variety of colors (dark green, orange, yellow, red, purple) everyday to get the widest array of nutrients.

There is strong scientific evidence that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease.  The largest and longest study to date was conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health where the health and dietary habits of nearly 110,000 men and women were followed for 14 years.  When these findings were combined with other U.S. and Europe studies, they found individuals who consumed more than five servings of fruits and vegetables per day had a 20 percent lower risk of cardiovascular disease when compared to individuals who consumed less than three servings per day.

A serving of fruit is 1/2 cup.  A serving of vegetables is 1/2 cup, except raw leafy greens, which is 1 cup.  Based on these studies, it is recommended to consume at least five servings of fruits and vegetables.  The higher your calorie intake is, the more fruits and vegetables you can consume.  My calorie intake is roughly 2,100 calories, and I eat ten servings of fruits and vegetables.

To eat more fruit, try fresh fruit for dessert and as a topping on your morning cereal, oatmeal, or porridge.  Try fruits salads and snack on apples or bananas.  Also mix fresh fruit into salads.  To eat more vegetables, try oven-roasted vegetable medleys, stir fries, soups, stews, and salads,  Build meals around beans, an important vegetable.  Also explore the produce aisle at the store and try something new, because variety is as important as quantity.

Written in response to the prompt: Home Turf.